Coinbase: Alle Gebühren und Kosten im Überblick - CHIP

Cryptocurrency News & Discussion

The official source for CryptoCurrency News, Discussion & Analysis.
[link]

Cryptocurrency news and discussions.

Cryptocurrency news and discussion. Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Monero, Dash, NEO, IOTA Lightning Network, SegWit, Augur, Steemit, privacy, ICO, block time, Proof of Work, Proof of Stake, NEM, Peercoin, Vertcoin, Iconomi, Dogecoin, Zcash, BitShares, Walton, mining, hashrate, mining difficulty, blockchain, coinbase, merkle, transaction rate, decentralized exchange, annual inflation rate, total market cap, bitcoin cash, BTC
[link]

r/Cryptocurrency testing

For testing out CSS changes to CryptoCurrency.
[link]

Mobile wallets and security

So in the light of Coinbase Pro's recent fee hike, and because "not your keys, not your crypto", I'm planning to pull my coins (mostly Bitcoin/Ether and some DAI) out of their custody and into a proper non-custodial wallet. In preparation for that, I've recently downloaded a bunch of popular iOS wallet apps to take them for a test drive so I can make an informed decision.
My criteria for a wallet are as follows:
Wallets I've considered so far:
One thing I've noticed, and which strikes me as a bit odd, is that all of these wallets are free, and all of them quite professionally done. I literally could not find any wallet that costs money, which obviously raises the question "how are they paying their developers?" — As we all know from companies like Facebook and Google, if the product is free, then YOU'RE the product being sold. Sadly, none of these apps even address this seemingly obvious concern on their websites. At least Ethos takes the time to explain their wallet's security measures, however, just like with the other apps, you'll have to take them by their word when they say that your key never leaves your device.
Now, Coinbase Wallet and Trust Wallet are owned by major exchanges (Binance ownes the latter), so they are likely financed by revenues made from trading fees, and provided for free as a customer service. Trust has integrated support for Binance DEX, which would potentially create another stream of revenue for them, while Coinbase likely just want to offer a non-custodial solution for customers who are concerned about security.
The other wallets include fiat gateways, so I am assuming that this will pay for the development of their apps. Ethos also appears to be using this opportunity to shill their own token, so I guess that's another source of revenue for them. I do wish, however, that companies would take a more proactive approach and answer the obvious question "why should I trust YOU with my coins?" After all, you are putting yourself at risk to potentially lose a significant amount of money in case they mess up, and it wouldn't even be the first time.
Has anyone here used a software wallet to store a significant amount of coins (> $10k)? If so, which one, and why? Or should I just invest in a hardware wallet at this point? My gripes with the latter (I've test driven a Ledger Nano X before) are that ...
  1. Yet another device to keep track of (and potentially lose)
  2. UX is quite cumbersome (it's awfully annoying to enter a 4-8 digit PIN code using only two buttons)
  3. No biometric authentication (I'm sure that's bound to come at some point in the future)
Looking forward to hear your thoughts on this.
EDIT: add info about Ethos token
submitted by deadcow5 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

RE: You should decide for yourself if managing your own keys is the right choice.

This is in response to this post
While I whole heartily agree with the headline, not so much with the post it-self.
you don’t need to manage your keys to participate in crypto responsibly. If you don’t trust yourself to secure your money, it’s fine to trust a 3rd party to help you. Coinbase or Binance are both better at securing money than the average crypto user.
Let’s not forget about the entire point of this crypto movement. Before crypto “currency” it was using crypto to secure privacy
A cypherpunk is any activist advocating widespread use of strong cryptography and privacy-enhancing technologies as a route to social and political change. Originally communicating through the Cypherpunks electronic mailing list, informal groups aimed to achieve privacy and security through proactive use of cryptography. Cypherpunks have been engaged in an active movement since the late 1980s.
The currency aspect of "crypto" was with the advent of Bitcoin. It was a continuation of these cypherpunk principles (and the ones who created it). It wasn’t about smart contracts (which are awesome), trading, getting rich, lambos (despite my name), trading, HOLD’ing, using exchanges, etc. It’s about control. It’s to bank the un-banked, remove the middle man & the banks, give complete control to the individual.
That said, some of OP’s points are valid. Those points are summed up by knowing your limits and assessing your own risk in securing your funds. But relying on 3rd party’s on securing your funds is not “fine”. Following the basic principles of “crypto” does not make you a “anarcho-radicalism” – it’s the entire reason why crypto has value in the first place. I use Chase and Bank of America, they work great for me. I invest, control and use crypto for different reasons. If we look at Coinbase and Binance as trusted sources, it blurs the line from traditional finance and crypto.
There are many resources out there on how to properly create paper wallets and how to secure them, using hardware wallets, full nodes (Parity, Geth), and other means such as MEW. I encourage those new to the space to investigate these even if you’re not technical. You would at least be able to assess your options when handling your crypto.
Some of the posts I’ve made regarding security
For those who don't know the phrase, “Not your keys, not your Bitcoin”
submitted by OneSmallStepForLambo to ethtrader [link] [comments]

A Beginners Guide to Bitcoin, Blockchain & Cryptocurrency

As cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology become more abundant throughout our society, it’s important to understand the inner workings of this technology, especially if you plan to use cryptocurrency as an investment vehicle. If you’re new to the crypto-sphere, learning about Bitcoin makes it much easier to understand other cryptocurrencies as many other altcoins' technologies are borrowed directly from Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is one of those things that you look into only to discover you have more questions than answers, and right as you’re starting to wrap your head around the technology; you discover the fact that Bitcoin has six other variants (forks), the amount of politics at hand, or that there are over a thousand different cryptocurrencies just as complex if not even more complex than Bitcoin.
We are currently in the infancy of blockchain technology and the effects of this technology will be as profound as the internet. This isn’t something that’s just going to fade away into history as you may have been led to believe. I believe this is something that will become an integral part of our society, eventually embedded within our technology. If you’re a crypto-newbie, be glad that you're relatively early to the industry. I hope this post will put you on the fast-track to understanding Bitcoin, blockchain, and how a large percentage of cryptocurrencies work.

Community Terminology

Altcoin: Short for alternative coin. There are over 1,000 different cryptocurrencies. You’re probably most familiar with Bitcoin. Anything that isn’t Bitcoin is generally referred to as an altcoin.
HODL: Misspelling of hold. Dank meme accidentally started by this dude. Hodlers are much more interested in long term gains rather than playing the risky game of trying to time the market.
TO THE MOON: When a cryptocurrency’s price rapidly increases. A major price spike of over 1,000% can look like it’s blasting off to the moon. Just be sure you’re wearing your seatbelt when it comes crashing down.
FUD: Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.
FOMO: Fear of missing out.
Bull Run: Financial term used to describe a rising market.
Bear Run: Financial term used to describe a falling market.

What Is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin (BTC) is a decentralized digital currency that uses cryptography to secure and ensure validity of transactions within the network. Hence the term crypto-currency. Decentralization is a key aspect of Bitcoin. There is no CEO of Bitcoin or central authoritative government in control of the currency. The currency is ran and operated by the people, for the people. One of the main development teams behind Bitcoin is blockstream.
Bitcoin is a product of blockchain technology. Blockchain is what allows for the security and decentralization of Bitcoin. To understand Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, you must understand to some degree, blockchain. This can get extremely technical the further down the rabbit hole you go, and because this is technically a beginners guide, I’m going to try and simplify to the best of my ability and provide resources for further technical reading.

A Brief History

Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto. The identity of Nakamoto is unknown. The idea of Bitcoin was first introduced in 2008 when Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper - Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. Later, in January 2009, Nakamoto announced the Bitcoin software and the Bitcoin network officially began.
I should also mention that the smallest unit of a Bitcoin is called a Satoshi. 1 BTC = 100,000,000 Satoshis. When purchasing Bitcoin, you don’t actually need to purchase an entire coin. Bitcoin is divisible, so you can purchase any amount greater than 1 Satoshi (0.00000001 BTC).

What Is Blockchain?

Blockchain is a distributed ledger, a distributed collection of accounts. What is being accounted for depends on the use-case of the blockchain itself. In the case of Bitcoin, what is being accounted for is financial transactions.
The first block in a blockchain is referred to as the genesis block. A block is an aggregate of data. Blocks are also discovered through a process known as mining (more on this later). Each block is cryptographically signed by the previous block in the chain and visualizing this would look something akin to a chain of blocks, hence the term, blockchain.
For more information regarding blockchain I’ve provided more resouces below:

What is Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin mining is one solution to the double spend problem. Bitcoin mining is how transactions are placed into blocks and added onto the blockchain. This is done to ensure proof of work, where computational power is staked in order to solve what is essentially a puzzle. If you solve the puzzle correctly, you are rewarded Bitcoin in the form of transaction fees, and the predetermined block reward. The Bitcoin given during a block reward is also the only way new Bitcoin can be introduced into the economy. With a halving event occurring roughly every 4 years, it is estimated that the last Bitcoin block will be mined in the year 2,140. (See What is Block Reward below for more info).
Mining is one of those aspects of Bitcoin that can get extremely technical and more complicated the further down the rabbit hole you go. An entire website could be created (and many have) dedicated solely to information regarding Bitcoin mining. The small paragraph above is meant to briefly expose you to the function of mining and the role it plays within the ecosystem. It doesn’t even scratch the surface regarding the topic.

How do you Purchase Bitcoin?

The most popular way to purchase Bitcoin through is through an online exchange where you trade fiat (your national currency) for Bitcoin.
Popular exchanges include:
  • Coinbase
  • Kraken
  • Cex
  • Gemini
There’s tons of different exchanges. Just make sure you find one that supports your national currency.

Volatility

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are EXTREMELY volatile. Swings of 30% or more within a few days is not unheard of. Understand that there is always inherent risks with any investment. Cryptocurrencies especially. Only invest what you’re willing to lose.

Transaction & Network Fees

Transacting on the Bitcoin network is not free. Every purchase or transfer of Bitcoin will cost X amount of BTC depending on how congested the network is. These fees are given to miners as apart of the block reward.
Late 2017 when Bitcoin got up to $20,000USD, the average network fee was ~$50. Currently, at the time of writing this, the average network fee is $1.46. This data is available in real-time on BitInfoCharts.

Security

In this new era of money, there is no central bank or government you can go to in need of assistance. This means the responsibility of your money falls 100% into your hands. That being said, the security regarding your cryptocurrency should be impeccable. The anonymity provided by cryptocurrencies alone makes you a valuable target to hackers and scammers. Below I’ve detailed out best practices regarding securing your cryptocurrency.

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication is a second way of authenticating your identity upon signing in to an account. Most cryptocurrency related software/websites will offer or require some form of 2FA. Upon creation of any crypto-related account find the Security section and enable 2FA.

SMS Authentication

The most basic form of 2FA which you are probably most familiar with. This form of authentication sends a text message to your smartphone with a special code that will allow access to your account upon entry. Note that this is not the safest form of 2FA as you may still be vulnerable to what is known as a SIM swap attack. SIM swapping is a social engineering method in which an attacker will call up your phone carrier, impersonating you, in attempt to re-activate your SIM card on his/her device. Once the attacker has access to your SIM card he/she now has access to your text messages which can then be used to access your online accounts. You can prevent this by using an authenticator such as Google Authenticator.

Authenticator

The use of an authenticator is the safest form of 2FA. An authenticator is installed on a seperate device and enabling it requires you input an ever changing six digit code in order to access your account. I recommend using Google Authenticator.
If a website has the option to enable an authenticator, it will give you a QR code and secret key. Use Google Authenticator to scan the QR code. The secret key consists of a random string of numbers and letters. Write this down on a seperate sheet of paper and do not store it on a digital device.
Once Google Authenticator has been enabled, every time you sign into your account, you will have to input a six-digit code that looks similar to this. If you happen to lose or damage the device you have Google Authenticator installed on, you will be locked out of your account UNLESS you have access to the secret key (which you should have written down).

Hardware Wallets

A wallet is what you store Bitcoin and cryptocurrency on. I’ll provide resources on the different type of wallets later but I want to emphasize the use of a hardware wallet (aka cold storage).
Hardware wallets are the safest way of storing cryptocurrency because it allows for your crypto to be kept offline in a physical device. After purchasing crypto via an exchange, I recommend transferring it to cold storage. The most popular hardware wallets include the Ledger Nano S, and Trezor.
Hardware wallets come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key as well as any other sensitive information in a safety deposit box.
I know this all may seem a bit manic, but it is important you take the necessary security precautions in order to ensure the safety & longevity of your cryptocurrency.

Technical Aspects of Bitcoin

TL;DR
  • Address: What you send Bitcoin to.
  • Wallet: Where you store your Bitcoin
  • Max Supply: 21 million
  • Block Time: ~10 minutes
  • Block Size: 1-2 MB
  • Block Reward: BTC reward received from mining.

What is a Bitcoin Address?

A Bitcoin address is what you send Bitcoin to. If you want to receive Bitcoin you’d give someone your Bitcoin address. Think of a Bitcoin address as an email address for money.

What is a Bitcoin Wallet?

As the title implies, a Bitcoin wallet is anything that can store Bitcoin. There are many different types of wallets including paper wallets, software wallets and hardware wallets. It is generally advised NOT to keep cryptocurrency on an exchange, as exchanges are prone to hacks (see Mt. Gox hack).
My preferred method of storing cryptocurrency is using a hardware wallet such as the Ledger Nano S or Trezor. These allow you to keep your crypto offline in physical form and as a result, much more safe from hacks. Paper wallets also allow for this but have less functionality in my opinion.
After I make crypto purchases, I transfer it to my Ledger Nano S and keep that in a safe at home. Hardware wallets also come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key in a safety deposit box.

What is Bitcoins Max Supply?

The max supply of Bitcoin is 21 million. The only way new Bitcoins can be introduced into the economy are through block rewards which are given after successfully mining a block (more on this later).

What is Bitcoins Block Time?

The average time in which blocks are created is called block time. For Bitcoin, the block time is ~10 minutes, meaning, 10 minutes is the minimum amount of time it will take for a Bitcoin transaction to be processed. Note that transactions on the Bitcoin network can take much longer depending on how congested the network is. Having to wait a few hours or even a few days in some instances for a transaction to clear is not unheard of.
Other cryptocurrencies will have different block times. For example, Ethereum has a block time of ~15 seconds.
For more information on how block time works, Prabath Siriwardena has a good block post on this subject which can be found here.

What is Bitcoins Block Size?

There is a limit to how large blocks can be. In the early days of Bitcoin, the block size was 36MB, but in 2010 this was reduced to 1 MB in order to prevent distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS), spam, and other malicious use on the blockchain. Nowadays, blocks are routinely in excess of 1MB, with the largest to date being somewhere around 2.1 MB.
There is much debate amongst the community on whether or not to increase Bitcoin’s block size limit to account for ever-increasing network demand. A larger block size would allow for more transactions to be processed. The con argument to this is that decentralization would be at risk as mining would become more centralized. As a result of this debate, on August 1, 2017, Bitcoin underwent a hard-fork and Bitcoin Cash was created which has a block size limit of 8 MB. Note that these are two completely different blockchains and sending Bitcoin to a Bitcoin Cash wallet (or vice versa) will result in a failed transaction.
Update: As of May 15th, 2018 Bitcoin Cash underwent another hard fork and the block size has increased to 32 MB.
On the topic of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash and which cryptocurrency is better, I’ll let you do your own research and make that decision for yourself. It is good to know that this is a debated topic within the community and example of the politics that manifest within the space. Now if you see community members arguing about this topic, you’ll at least have a bit of background to the issue.

What is Block Reward?

Block reward is the BTC you receive after discovering a block. Blocks are discovered through a process called mining. The only way new BTC can be added to the economy is through block rewards and the block reward is halved every 210,000 blocks (approximately every 4 years). Halving events are done to limit the supply of Bitcoin. At the inception of Bitcoin, the block reward was 50BTC. At the time of writing this, the block reward is 12.5BTC. Halving events will continue to occur until the amount of new Bitcoin introduced into the economy becomes less than 1 Satoshi. This is expected to happen around the year 2,140. All 21 million Bitcoins will have been mined. Once all Bitcoins have been mined, the block reward will only consist of transaction fees.

Technical Aspects Continued

Understanding Nodes

Straight from the Bitcoin.it wiki
Any computer that connects to the Bitcoin network is called a node. Nodes that fully verify all of the rules of Bitcoin are called full nodes.
In other words, full nodes are what verify the Bitcoin blockchain and they play a crucial role in maintaining the decentralized network. Full nodes store the entirety of the blockchain and validate transactions. Anyone can participate in the Bitcoin network and run a full node. Bitcoin.org has information on how to set up a full node. Running a full node also gives you wallet capabilities and the ability to query the blockchain.
For more information on Bitcoin nodes, see Andreas Antonopoulos’s Q&A on the role of nodes.

What is a Fork?

A fork is a divergence in a blockchain. Since Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer network, there’s an overall set of rules (protocol) in which participants within the network must abide by. These rules are put in place to form network consensus. Forks occur when implementations must be made to the blockchain or if there is disagreement amongst the network on how consensus should be achieved.

Soft Fork vs Hard Fork

The difference between soft and hard forks lies in compatibility. Soft forks are backwards compatible, hard forks are not. Think of soft forks as software upgrades to the blockchain, whereas hard forks are a software upgrade that warrant a completely new blockchain.
During a soft fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules. Nodes that do not upgrade will still accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin soft forks include:
A hard fork can be thought of as the creation of a new blockchain that X percentage of the community decides to migrate too. During a hard fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules, Nodes that do not upgrade are invalid and cannot accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin hard forks include:
  • Bitcoin Cash
  • Bitcoin Gold
Note that these are completely different blockchains and independent from the Bitcoin blockchain. If you try to send Bitcoin to one of these blockchains, the transaction will fail.

A Case For Bitcoin in a World of Centralization

Our current financial system is centralized, which means the ledger(s) that operate within this centralized system are subjugated to control, manipulation, fraud, and many other negative aspects that come with this system. There are also pros that come with a centralized system, such as the ability to swiftly make decisions. However, at some point, the cons outweigh the pros, and change is needed. What makes Bitcoin so special as opposed to our current financial system is that Bitcoin allows for the decentralized transfer of money. Not one person owns the Bitcoin network, everybody does. Not one person controls Bitcoin, everybody does. A decentralized system in theory removes much of the baggage that comes with a centralized system. Not to say the Bitcoin network doesn’t have its problems (wink wink it does), and there’s much debate amongst the community as to how to go about solving these issues. But even tiny steps are significant steps in the world of blockchain, and I believe Bitcoin will ultimately help to democratize our financial system, whether or not you believe it is here to stay for good.

Final Conclusions

Well that was a lot of words… Anyways I hope this guide was beneficial, especially to you crypto newbies out there. You may have come into this realm not expecting there to be an abundance of information to learn about. I know I didn’t. Bitcoin is only the tip of the iceberg, but now that you have a fundamental understanding of Bitcoin, learning about other cryptocurrencies such as Litecoin, and Ethereum will come more naturally.
Feel free to ask questions below! I’m sure either the community or myself would be happy to answer your questions.
Thanks for reading!

Related Links

Guides

Exchanges

submitted by MrCryptoDude to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I wrote a 30,000 ft. "executive summary" intro document for cryptos. Not for you, for your non-technical parents or friends.

This document was originally written for my dad, an intelligent guy who was utterly baffled about the cryptocurrency world. The aim was to be extremely concise, giving a broad overview of the industry and some popular coins while staying non-technical. For many of you there will be nothing new here, but recognize that you are in the 0.001% of the population heavily into crypto technology.
I've reproduced it for Reddit below, or you can find the original post here on my website. Download the PDF there or hit the direct link: .PDF version.
Donations happily accepted:
ETH: 0x4e03Bf5CCE3eec4Ddae4d3d6aAD46ca4f198AeD6 BTC: 1GqWMZRRygRJJWYYTWHkAVoRcgyQHjgBMZ XMR: 42Y1S1KBoPk381kc7hA68zaiC78BxMoCADjLrFcTdWiE7ejhZc49s1t9i7P2EmTnHsLDiKoSUiogCbLVHXRJxjrCT4WG8ic XRB: xrb_1bpzh745s9kzk8ymfnks3jtdi65ayumdstokzd4yw4ohu3fopxmiocjcntcu 

Background

This document is purely informational. At the time of writing there are over 1000 cryptocurrencies (“cryptos”) in a highly volatile, high risk market. Many of the smaller “altcoins” require significant technical knowledge to store and transact safely. I advise you to carefully scrutinize each crypto’s flavor of blockchain, potential utility, team of developers, and guiding philosophy, before making any investment [1] decisions. With that out of the way, what follows are brief, extremely high-level summaries of some cryptos which have my interest, listed in current market cap order. But first, some info:
Each crypto is a different implementation of a blockchain network. Originally developed as decentralized digital cash, these technologies have evolved into much broader platforms, powering the future of decentralized applications across every industry in the global economy. Without getting into the weeds, [2] most cryptos work on similar principles:
Distributed Ledgers Each node on a blockchain network has a copy of every transaction, which enables a network of trust that eliminates fraud. [3]
Decentralized “Miners” comprise the infrastructure of a blockchain network. [4] They are monetarily incentivized to add computing power to the network, simultaneously securing and processing each transaction. [5]
Peer-to-peer Cryptos act like digital cash-- they require no third party to transact and are relatively untraceable. Unlike cash, you can back them up.
Global Transactions are processed cheaply and instantly, anywhere on Earth. Using cryptos, an African peasant and a San Francisco engineer have the same access to capital, markets, and network services.
Secure Blockchains are predicated on the same cryptographic technology that secures your sensitive data and government secrets. They have passed seven years of real-world penetration testing with no failures. [6]

Bitcoin (BTC)

The first cryptocurrency. As with first movers in any technology, there are associated pros and cons. Bitcoin has by far the strongest brand recognition and deepest market penetration, and it is the only crypto which can be used directly as a currency at over 100,000 physical and web stores around the world. In Venezuela and Zimbabwe, where geopolitical events have created hyperinflation in the centralized fiat currency, citizens have moved to Bitcoin as a de facto transaction standard. [7]
However, Bitcoin unveiled a number of issues that have been solved by subsequent cryptos. It is experiencing significant scaling issues, resulting in high fees and long confirmation times. The argument over potential solutions created a rift in the Bitcoin developer community, who “forked” the network into two separate blockchains amidst drama and politicking in October 2017. Potential solutions to these issues abound, with some already in place, and others nearing deployment.
Bitcoin currently has the highest market cap, and since it is easy to buy with fiat currency, the price of many smaller cryptos (“altcoins”) are loosely pegged to its price. This will change in the coming year(s).

Ethereum (ETH)

Where Bitcoin is a currency, Ethereum is a platform, designed as a foundational protocol on which to develop decentralized applications (“Dapps”). Anyone can write code and deploy their program on the global network for extremely low fees. Just like Twitter wouldn’t exist without the open platform of the internet, the next world-changing Dapp can’t exist without Ethereum.
Current Dapps include a global market for idle computing power and storage, peer-to-peer real estate transactions (no trusted third party for escrow), identity networks for governments and corporations (think digital Social Security card), and monetization strategies for the internet which replace advertising. Think back 10 years to the advent of smartphones, and then to our culture today-- Ethereum could have a similar network effect on humanity.
Ethereum is currently the #2 market cap crypto below Bitcoin, and many believe it will surpass it in 2018. It has a large, active group of developers working to solve scaling issues, [8] maintain security, and create entirely new programming conventions. If successful, platforms like Ethereum may well be the foundation of the decentralized internet of the future.

Ripple (XRP)

Ripple is significantly more centralized than most crypto networks, designed as a backbone for the global banking and financial technology (“fintech”) industries. It is a network for exchanging between fiat currencies and other asset classes instantly and cheaply, especially when transacting cross-border and between separate institutions. It uses large banks and remittance companies as “anchors” to allow trading between any asset on the network, and big names like Bank of America, American Express, RBC, and UBS are partners. The utility of this network is global and massive in scale.
It is extremely important to note that not all cryptos have the same number of tokens. Ripple has 100 Billion tokens compared to Bitcoin’s 21 Million. Do not directly compare price between cryptos. XRP will likely never reach $1k, [9] but the price will rise commensurate with its utility as a financial tool.
In some sense, Ripple is anathema to the original philosophical vision of this technology space. And while I agree with the cyberpunk notion of decentralized currencies, separation of money and state, this is the natural progression of the crypto world. The internet was an incredible decentralized wild west of Usenet groups and listservs before Eternal September and the dot-com boom, but its maturation affected every part of global society.

Cardano (ADA)

Cardano’s main claim to fame: it is the only crypto developed using academic methodologies by a global collective of engineers and researchers, built on a foundation of industry-leading, peer-reviewed cryptographic research. The network was designed from first-principles to allow scalability, system upgrades, and to balance the privacy of its users with the security needs of regulators.
One part of this ecosystem is the Cardano Foundation, a Swiss non-profit founded to work proactively with governments and regulatory bodies to institute legal frameworks around the crypto industry. Detractors of Cardano claim that it doesn’t do anything innovative, but supporters see the academic backing and focus on regulation development as uniquely valuable.

Stellar Lumens (XLM)

Stellar Lumens and Ripple were founded by the same person. They initially shared the same code, but today the two are distinct in their technical back-end as well as their guiding philosophy and development goals. Ripple is closed-source, for-profit, deflationary, and intended for use by large financial institutions. Stellar is open-source, non-profit, inflationary, and intended to promote international wealth distribution. As such, they are not direct competitors.
IBM is a major partner to Stellar. Their network is already processing live transactions in 12 currency corridors across the South Pacific, with plans to process 60% of all cross-border payments in the South Pacific’s retail foreign exchange corridor by Q2 2018.
Beyond its utility as a financial tool, the Stellar network may become a competitor to Ethereum as a platform for application development and Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”). The theoretical maximum throughput for the network is higher, and it takes less computational power to run. The Stellar development team is highly active, has written extensive documentation for third-party developers, and has an impressive list of advisors, including Patrick Collison (Stripe), Sam Altman (Y Combinator), and other giants in the software development community.

Iota (IOT)

Iota was developed as the infrastructure backbone for the Internet of Things (IoT), sometimes called the machine economy. As the world of inanimate objects is networked together, their need to communicate grows exponentially. Fridges, thermostats, self-driving cars, printers, planes, and industrial sensors all need a secure protocol with which to transact information.
Iota uses a “Tangle” instead of a traditional blockchain, and this is the main innovation driving the crypto’s value. Each device that sends a transaction confirms two other transactions in the Tanlge. This removes the need for miners, and enables unique features like zero fees and infinite scalability. The supply of tokens is fixed forever at 2.8*1015, a staggeringly large number (almost three thousand trillion), and the price you see reported is technically “MIOT”, or the price for a million tokens.

Monero (XMR)

The most successful privacy-focused cryptocurrency. In Bitcoin and most other cryptos, anyone can examine the public ledger and trace specific coins through the network. If your identity can be attached to a public address on that network, an accurate picture of your transaction history can be built-- who, what, and when. Monero builds anonymity into the system using strong cryptographic principles, which makes it functionally impossible to trace coins, [10] attach names to wallets, or extract metadata from transactions. The development team actively publishes in the cryptography research community.
Anonymous transactions are not new-- we call it cash. Only in the past two decades has anonymity grown scarce in the first-world with the rise of credit cards and ubiquitous digital records. Personal data is becoming the most valuable resource on Earth, and there are many legitimate reasons for law-abiding citizens to want digital privacy, but it is true that with anonymity comes bad actors-- Monero is the currency of choice for the majority of black market (“darknet”) transactions. Similarly, US Dollars are the main vehicle for the $320B annual drug trade. An investment here should be based on the underlying cryptographic research and technology behind this coin, as well as competitors like Zcash. [11]

RaiBlocks (XRB)

Zero fees and instantaneous transfer make RaiBlocks extremely attractive for exchange of value, in many senses outperforming Bitcoin at its original intended purpose. This crypto has seen an explosion in price and exposure over the past month, and it may become the network of choice for transferring value within and between crypto exchanges.
Just in the first week of 2018: the CEO of Ledger (makers of the most popular hardware wallet on the market) waived the $50k code review fee to get RaiBlocks on his product, and XRB got listed on Binance and Kucoin, two of the largest altcoin exchanges globally. This is one to watch for 2018. [12]

VeChain (VEN)

Developed as a single answer to the problem of supply-chain logistics, VeChain is knocking on the door of a fast-growing $8 trillion industry. Every shipping container and packaged product in the world requires constant tracking and verification. A smart economy for logistics built on the blockchain promises greater efficiency and lower cost through the entire process flow.
Don’t take my word for it-- VeChain has investment from PwC (5th largest US corporation), Groupe Renault, Kuehne & Nagel (world’s largest freight company), and DIG (China’s largest wine importer). The Chinese government has mandated VeChain to serve as blockchain technology partner to the city of Gui’an, a special economic zone and testbed for China’s smart city of the future. This crypto has some of the strongest commercial partnerships in the industry, and a large active development team.
  1. “Investment” is a misnomer. Cryptos are traded like securities, but grant you no equity (like trading currency).
  2. The weeds for Bitcoin: basic intro (1:36), non-technical explanation (5:24), Bitcoin 101 – Andreas Antonopoulos (23:51).
  3. It is impossible to double-spend or create a fake transaction, as each ledger is confirmed against every other ledger.
  4. Some utility token blockchains use DAG networks or similar non-linear networks which don’t require mining.
  5. In practice, these are giant warehouses full of specialized computers constantly processing transactions. Miners locate to the cheapest electricity source, and the bulk of mining currently occurs in China.
  6. Centralized second-layer exchange websites have been hacked, but the core technology is untouched.
  7. This effect has been termed "bitcoinization".
  8. The Ethereum roadmap shows moving from a Proof of Work (PoW) to Proof of Stake (PoS) consensus model.
  9. At $2.62 per XRP token, Ripple already commands a $100B market cap.
  10. After a January 2017 update.
  11. Monero uses ring signatures while Zcash uses ZK-SNARKs to create anonymity. Both have pros and cons.
  12. Note: all signs point to this crypto being renamed “Nano” in the coming weeks: nano.co.
submitted by jhchawk to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Decred Journal – August 2018

Note: you can read this on GitHub (link), Medium (link) or old Reddit (link) to see all the links.

Development

dcrd: Version 1.3.0 RC1 (Release Candidate 1) is out! The main features of this release are significant performance improvements, including some that benefit SPV clients. Full release notes and downloads are on GitHub.
The default minimum transaction fee rate was reduced from 0.001 to 0.0001 DCkB. Do not try to send such small fee transactions just yet, until the majority of the network upgrades.
Release process was changed to use release branches and bump version on the master branch at the beginning of a release cycle. Discussed in this chat.
The codebase is ready for the new Go 1.11 version. Migration to vgo module system is complete and the 1.4.0 release will be built using modules. The list of versioned modules and a hierarchy diagram are available here.
The testnet was reset and bumped to version 3.
Comments are welcome for the proposal to implement smart fee estimation, which is important for Lightning Network.
@matheusd recorded a code review video for new Decred developers that explains how tickets are selected for voting.
dcrwallet: Version 1.3.0 RC1 features new SPV sync mode, new ticket buyer, new APIs for Decrediton and a host of bug fixes. On the dev side, dcrwallet also migrated to the new module system.
Decrediton: Version 1.3.0 RC1 adds the new SPV sync mode that syncs roughly 5x faster. The feature is off by default while it receives more testing from experienced users. Other notable changes include a design polish and experimental Politeia integration.
Politeia: Proposal editing is being developed and has a short demo. This will allow proposal owners to edit their proposal in response to community feedback before voting begins. The challenges associated with this feature relate to updating censorship tokens and maintaining a clear history of which version comments were made on. @fernandoabolafio produced this architecture diagram which may be of interest to developers.
@degeri joined to perform security testing of Politeia and found several issues.
dcrdata: mainnet explorer upgraded to v2.1 with several new features. For users: credit/debit tx filter on address page, showing miner fees on coinbase transaction page, estimate yearly ticket rewards on main page, cool new hamburger menu and keyboard navigation. For developers: new chain parameters page, experimental Insight API support, endpoints for coin supply and block rewards, testnet3 support. Lots of minor API changes and frontend tweaks, many bug fixes and robustness improvements.
The upcoming v3.0 entered beta and is deployed on beta.dcrdata.org. Check out the new charts page. Feedback and bug reports are appreciated. Finally, the development version v3.1.0-pre is on alpha.dcrdata.org.
Android: updated to be compatible with the latest SPV code and is syncing, several performance issues are worked on. Details were posted in chat. Alpha testing has started, to participate please join #dev and ask for the APK.
iOS: backend is mostly complete, as well as the front end. Support for devices with smaller screens was improved. What works now: creating and recovering wallets, listing of transactions, receiving DCR, displaying and scanning QR codes, browsing account information, SPV connection to peers, downloading headers. Some bugs need fixing before making testable builds.
Ticket splitting: v0.6.0 beta released with improved fee calculation and multiple bug fixes.
docs: introduced new Governance section that grouped some old articles as well as the new Politeia page.
@Richard-Red created a concept repository sandbox with policy documents, to illustrate the kind of policies that could be approved and amended by Politeia proposals.
decred.org: 8 contributors added and 4 removed, including 2 advisors (discussion here).
decredmarketcap.com is a brand new website that shows the most accurate DCR market data. Clean design, mobile friendly, no javascript required.
Dev activity stats for August: 239 active PRs, 219 commits, 25k added and 11k deleted lines spread across 8 repositories. Contributions came from 2-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: went from 54 to 76 PH/s, the low was 50 and the new all-time high is 100 PH/s. BeePool share rose to ~50% while F2Pool shrank to 30%, followed by coinmine.pl at 5% and Luxor at 3%.
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 95.6 DCR (+3.0) as of Sep 3. During the month, ticket price fluctuated between a low of 92.2 and high of 100.5 DCR. Locked DCR represented between 3.8 and 3.9 million or 46.3-46.9% of the supply.
Nodes: there are 217 public listening and 281 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 2% at v1.4.0(pre) (dev builds), 5% on v1.3.0 (RC1), 62% on v1.2.0 (-5%), 22% on v1.1.2 (-2%), 6% on v1.1.0 (-1%). Almost 69% of nodes are v.1.2.0 and higher and support client filters. Data snapshot of Aug 31.

ASICs

Obelisk posted 3 email updates in August. DCR1 units are reportedly shipping with 1 TH/s hashrate and will be upgraded with firmware to 1.5 TH/s. Batch 1 customers will receive compensation for missed shipment dates, but only after Batch 5 ships. Batch 2-5 customers will be receiving the updated slim design.
Innosilicon announced the new D9+ DecredMaster: 2.8 TH/s at 1,230 W priced $1,499. Specified shipping date was Aug 10-15.
FFMiner DS19 claims 3.1 TH/s for Blake256R14 at 680 W and simultaneously 1.55 TH/s for Blake2B at 410 W, the price is $1,299. Shipping Aug 20-25.
Another newly noticed miner offer is this unit that does 46 TH/s at 2,150 W at the price of $4,720. It is shipping Nov 2018 and the stats look very close to Pangolin Whatsminer DCR (which has now a page on asicminervalue).

Integrations

www.d1pool.com joined the list of stakepools for a total of 16.
Australian CoinTree added DCR trading. The platform supports fiat, there are some limitations during the upgrade to a new system but also no fees in the "Early access mode". On a related note, CoinTree is working on a feature to pay household bills with cryptocurrencies it supports.
Three new OTC desks were added to exchanges page at decred.org.
Two mobile wallets integrated Decred:
Reminder: do your best to understand the security and privacy model before using any wallet software. Points to consider: who controls the seed, does the wallet talk to the nodes directly or via middlemen, is it open source or not?

Adoption

Merchants:

Marketing

Targeted advertising report for August was posted by @timhebel. Facebook appeal is pending, some Google and Twitter campaigns were paused and some updated. Read more here.
Contribution to the @decredproject Twitter account has evolved over the past few months. A #twitter_ops channel is being used on Matrix to collaboratively draft and execute project account tweets (including retweets). Anyone with an interest in contributing to the Twitter account can ask for an invitation to the channel and can start contributing content and ideas there for evaluation by the Twitter group. As a result, no minority or unilateral veto over tweets is possible. (from GitHub)

Events

Attended:
For those willing to help with the events:
BAB: Hey all, we are gearing up for conference season. I have a list of places we hope to attend but need to know who besides @joshuam and @Haon are willing to do public speaking, willing to work booths, or help out at them? You will need to be well versed on not just what is Decred, but the history of Decred etc... DM me if you are interested. (#event_planning)
The Decred project is looking for ambassadors. If you are looking for a fun cryptocurrency to get involved in send me a DM or come talk to me on Decred slack. (@marco_peereboom, longer version here)

Media

Decred Assembly episode 21 is available. @jy-p and lead dcrwallet developer @jrick discussed SPV from Satoshi's whitepaper, how it can be improved upon and what's coming in Decred.
Decred Assembly episodes 1-21 are available in audio only format here.
New instructional articles on stakey.club: Decrediton setup, Deleting the wallet, Installing Go, Installing dcrd, dcrd as a Linux service. Available in both English and Portuguese.
Decred scored #32 in the August issue of Chinese CCID ratings. The evaluation model was explained in this interview.
Satis Group rated Decred highly in their cryptoasset valuation research report (PDF). This was featured by several large media outlets, but some did not link to or omitted Decred entirely, citing low market cap.
Featured articles:
Articles:
Videos:

Community Discussions

Community stats:
Comm systems news:
After another debate about chat systems more people began testing and using Matrix, leading to some gardening on that platform:
Highlights:
Reddit: substantive discussion about Decred cons; ecosystem fund; a thread about voter engagement, Politeia UX and trolling; idea of a social media system for Decred by @michae2xl; how profitable is the Obelisk DCR1.
Chats: cross-chain trading via LN; plans for contractor management system, lower-level decision making and contractor privacy vs transparency for stakeholders; measuring dev activity; what if the network stalls, multiple implementations of Decred for more resilience, long term vision behind those extensive tests and accurate comments in the codebase; ideas for process for policy documents, hosting them in Pi and approving with ticket voting; about SPV wallet disk size, how compact filters work; odds of a wallet fetching a wrong block in SPV; new module system in Go; security of allowing Android app backups; why PoW algo change proposal must be specified in great detail; thoughts about NIPoPoWs and SPV; prerequisites for shipping SPV by default (continued); Decred vs Dash treasury and marketing expenses, spending other people's money; why Decred should not invade a country, DAO and nation states, entangling with nation state is poor resource allocation; how winning tickets are determined and attack vectors; Politeia proposal moderation, contractor clearance, the scale of proposals and decision delegation, initial Politeia vote to approve Politeia itself; chat systems, Matrix/Slack/Discord/RocketChat/Keybase (continued); overview of Korean exchanges; no breaking changes in vgo; why project fund burn rate must keep low; asymptotic behavior of Decred and other ccs, tail emission; count of full nodes and incentives to run them; Politeia proposal translations and multilingual environment.
An unusual event was the chat about double negatives and other oddities in languages in #trading.

Markets

DCR started the month at USD 56 / BTC 0.0073 and had a two week decline. On Aug 14 the whole market took a huge drop and briefly went below USD 200 billion. Bitcoin went below USD 6,000 and top 100 cryptos lost 5-30%. The lowest point coincided with Bitcoin dominance peak at 54.5%. On that day Decred dived -17% and reached the bottom of USD 32 / BTC 0.00537. Since then it went sideways in the USD 35-45 / BTC 0.0054-0.0064 range. Around Aug 24, Huobi showed DCR trading volume above USD 5M and this coincided with a minor recovery.
@ImacallyouJawdy posted some creative analysis based on ticket data.

Relevant External

StopAndDecrypt published an extensive article "ASIC Resistance is Nothing but a Blockchain Buzzword" that is much in line with Decred's stance on ASICs.
The ongoing debates about the possible Sia fork yet again demonstrate the importance of a robust dispute resolution mechanism. Also, we are lucky to have the treasury.
Mark B Lundeberg, who found a vulnerability in atomicswap earlier, published a concept of more private peer-to-peer atomic swaps. (missed in July issue)
Medium took a cautious stance on cryptocurrencies and triggered at least one project to migrate to Ghost (that same project previously migrated away from Slack).
Regulation: Vietnam bans mining equipment imports, China halts crypto events and tightens control of crypto chat groups.
Reddit was hacked by intercepting 2FA codes sent via SMS. The announcement explains the impact. Yet another data breach suggests to think twice before sharing any data with any company and shift to more secure authentication systems.
Intel and x86 dumpsterfire keeps burning brighter. Seek more secure hardware and operating systems for your coins.
Finally, unrelated to Decred but good for a laugh: yetanotherico.com.

About This Issue

This is the 5th issue of Decred Journal. It is mirrored on GitHub, Medium and Reddit. Past issues are available here.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Feedback is appreciated: please comment on Reddit, GitHub or #writers_room on Matrix or Slack.
Contributions are welcome too. Some areas are collecting content, pre-release review or translations to other languages. Check out @Richard-Red's guide how to contribute to Decred using GitHub without writing code.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Haon, jazzah, Richard-Red and thedecreddigest.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

Coinbase Binance Dance. Guide to Purchasing Altcoins.

Coinbase Binance Dance. Guide to purchasing altcoins.

The Coinbase Binance dance is a multi-step process used to purchase altcoins. (An altcoin is any cryptocurrency that is not Bitcoin). Reddit in particular is very fond of this method as it is commonly recommended to newcomers.
How it works: You purchase Ethereum using Coinbase, send that Ethereum to your Binance account, then execute a trade selling said Ethereum for your cryptocurrency of choice.
This is a process that seems very tedious and a bit complicated to crypto-newbies. No need to worry, I’m going to walk you through the process with photos included for visual aid.
Using this method, you can purchase various types of cryptocurrencies including:
Etc… the list goes on. So long as it’s listed on Binance, you will be able to trade for the coin.

Accounts to sign up for

Both Coinbase and Binance are cryptocurrency exchanges you must sign up for in order to do this method.
I recommend you create these accounts sooner rather than later as it can take a few days to get fully verified (especially for Coinbase).
If you’re having issues, or questions, or would just like more information, I have full detailed tutorials regarding both Coinbase & Binance.
See below:

I have created these accounts. What do I do now?

Awesome! You’ve got the accounts created, now it’s time to do the dance. For the sake of this tutorial I’ll be purchasing the cryptocurrency XRP. Remember, this method works with any cryptocurrency so long as it’s listed on Binance.
  • Step 1: Make sure your token can be purchased with Ethereum. Go to Binance's home page and select ETH Markets use the search bar to look for your tokens ticker. See photo.
    If your token does not appear, check BTC Markets. If you see it there, you'll need to buy BTC and send it to Binance instead of ETH.
  • Step 2: Purchase Ethereum using Coinbase. See photo.
    For the lowest possible fee in Coinbase, link your bank account the downside is that it will take 5-7 business days for your funds to be available to send from your account. To have instant access to your funds, pay with a credit/debit card. The downside to this being that fees will be higher.
  • Step 3: Send your Ethereum from Coinbase to your Binance Ethereum wallet address. See photo.
Optional: Depending on your location, you may or may not have to pay a Coinbase transfer fee. If you see that you do and would rather not, you can mitigate this fee by sending your crypto to Coinbase Pro or GDAX then to Binance. If this otherwise does not concern you, please continue below.
To find your Binance Ethereum wallet address, go to: Funds > Deposits > ETH - Ethereum and click Copy Address. See photo.
Once you click confirm, you’ll be asked to complete 2-step verification provided by your phone. See photo.
You can view the transaction in Coinbase. After a few minutes you’ll see confirmations coming through. Refresh the Binance deposits page as well and you’ll see confirmations. See photo.
You’ll get two emails during this process. One from Coinbase, another from Binance. Cryptocurrency transactions are not instantaneous on the Ethereum blockchain. In this case it took ~6 minutes for this transfer to complete, however this may vary depending on how congested the network is. During high periods of high traffic on the Ethereum blockchain, you can expect it to take longer than 6 minutes so don’t worry if it’s taking longer. As long as you’re seeing confirmation, you should be good. See photo.
Once you receive the Deposit Success Alerts email from Binance, go to Funds > Balances in Binance. You’ll see that you’re Ethereum balance has increased. See photo.
  • Step 4: In Binance, go to Exchange > Basic. You’ll be met with a screen that looks like this. See photo.
    I know this screen looks a bit confusing. It’s really not. First thing we need to do is make sure Ethereum (ETH) is set as our baseline currency for trade.
  • Step 5: Set Ethereum as baseline currency. See photo.
    You can see in that photo what is shown is all the possible cryptocurrencies pairings available with Ethereum.
  • Step 6: Use the search bar to search for the token’s ticker you’d like to purchase. See photo.
    In the case for Ripple, the ticker is XRP. If you don’t know your coins ticker, Google it.
  • Step 7: Set your prefered parameters and click Buy. See photo.
    The 25% 50% 75% and 100% buttons refer to how much of your set baseline funds you would like to dedicate towards your purchase. In my case, by clicking 100% I am saying I’d like to use 100% of my Ethereum funds to purchase XRP. Clicking 75% would be 75% of my ETH funds etc…
    The Amount and Totals sections are automatically filled out based off your % choice.
  • Step 8: Wait for your order to be filled!
    Depending on the market, your order may be filled right away or not. If you’re getting impatient you can always cancel the order and try again at a slightly higher price. If you’re going to edit the price per coin section, just be sure you don’t accidentally end up paying a ridiculously high amount.
    If you click into the price field a blurb will appear showing you how much you’re paying per coin. See photo.
Congratulations! You’ve just done the Coinbase Binanace dance. Wasn’t so hard was it? Once your order has been completely filled, the Funds > Balances page should reflect your purchase. See photo.

Lower Fees using BNB

It helps to purchase a little bit of Binance native token BNB to help save on fees. Make sure you enable it in your account settings! See photo.
You can purchase BNB using the same method described above.

Selling your crypto.

Selling your crypto is a very similar process. In my instance with my XRP, if I wanted to sell that back to USD. I’d need to sell the XRP for Ethereum, then sell that Ethereum for USD on Coinbase.
The process would look something like this:
  • Sell my XRP for Ethereum in Binance
  • Withdrawal the Ethereum from Binance to Coinbase
  • Sell the Ethereum for USD through Coinbase.

Recommendations

If you consider yourself a hodler, and do not plan to actively be making trades, I highly recommend you send your crypto to a hardware wallet such as the Ledger Nano S. Hardware wallets are a form of cold storage and are the safest way to store cryptocurrency.
It is highly recommended you DO NOT store crypto on any exchange as exchanges themselves are prone to hacks (see Mt. Gox hack).
I also highly recommend you secure your Binance and Coinbase accounts with 2-factor authentication (2FA) and google authenticator to reduce the risk of a hack.

Conclusions

In the end, be glad that you learned how to do this process! Figuring out how to actually purchase cryptocurrency is one of the most challenging things for newbies, and now that you have a Coinbase and Binance account setup, you have the ability to purchase 95% of coins.
If you have any questions feel free to comment down below or send me a message. I’d be happy to help!

Frequently Asked Questions

Why not use Bitcoin to send to Binance. Why use Ethereum?
  • Transactions on the Ethereum blockchain are faster than Bitcoin's. Ethereum has a block time of ~15s, Bitcoin has a block time of ~10min. This means on average, Ethereum transactions will be faster than Bitcoins. Fees are also lower on the Ethereum blockchain so I consider Ethereum to be a much better bridge currency in the use of purchasing altcoins.
You could also use Litecoin if you wanted to. Litecoin has a smaller block time (2m 34s) compared to Bitcoin and the fees are much lower.
To see block time data on blockchains, BitInfoCharts is a very good resource.

Related Resources

submitted by MrCryptoDude to BinanceExchange [link] [comments]

As Bitcoin Gold Jumps 50%+ in one day, time to ask... what is Coinbase doing with all those fork funds they've not supported?

Today Bitcoin Gold (BTG) has a MC of $2,630,984,532, each are worth $156.47. In the past 24hrs the price has outperformed most jumping almost 50%+.
BTG hard forked from Bitcoin on 24 October 2017, and has survived for months now.
Here was the Coinbase official stance on the matter from last year:
https://support.coinbase.com/customeportal/articles/2892196-bitcoin-gold-faq
You can see a list of all the major exchanges and wallets that have now implemented support for BTG here which include Bitfinex, Binance, Shapeshift, Ledger, Trezor etc
https://bitcoingold.org
GDAX Coinbase's exchange is still tagged as "future".
Todays spike is a strange one as there has been a fair amount of community cynicism over BTG in the past.
Some of the controversies outlined on its wiki included post-mining, bonus taking, secret mining code and wallet hacks.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitcoin_Gold
That said when you think about the amount of money being retained by large exchanges such as coinbase from all the forks such as BTG, it ptobably eclipses anything BTG has done value wise. In fact BTG has probably posted more updates than Coinbase on the BTG funds they're holding.
The obvious reminder is always retain your private keys yourself, keep them in a hard wallet away from the exchanges or you'll always run the risk of not being able to benifit frim the growing number of hard forks.
That said, I think many newcomers, particularly using gateway exchanges to buy gateway crypto's have just got to grips with concept of Crypto and buying it.
I can understand how then buying hardware wallets and transferring crypto to them could be a daunting task.
I think for those people, maybe lured in to crypto with the likes of Coinbase referral programs really deserve to get at least regular updates from exchanges that are not supporting forks... how, where, why and when.
Also this doesn't include Airdrops where new ICO cryptos are distributed relative to someones holdings of another Crypto such as Bitcoin or Ethereum... again Exchange hodlers are missing out.
Companies and stock brokers need to keep investors updated when issuing dividends to shareholders,
That helps investors to make the educated decision whither or not to keep their money in invested in that company or not for the longterm.
Exchanges should be doing the same for forked funds.
I think with ever new fork that emerges Coinbase are setting themselves up for future legal challenge of somesort, forcing them to go back and support/ distribute all the forked funds they are holding.
This was evident in the case of Bitcoin Cash as it was only rumors of legal action against them that really seemed to get them to up their game.
This is a the risky cloud that will hang over them, particularly when going out for more rounds of funding their growth, as it's a big question mark future risk investors.
They need to be proactive addressing forked funds, instead of just bottling up a future storm by ignoring them.
All in all forks aren't really Coinbase's fault, but their lack of updates are. They have warned people just to take their crypto off the exchange in the past, but when at the same time as they are priding themselves on and encouraging the sign ups of newcomers that maybe aren't as technically minded I don't think this is enough?
submitted by jam-hay to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Bitcoin posts from 2018-10-09 to 2018-10-16 19:41 PDT

Period: 7.10 days
Submissions Comments
Total 765 10226
Rate (per day) 107.80 1494.28
Unique Redditors 596 3440
Combined Score 31658 33963

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 4526 points, 1 submission: Alexsayzz
    1. Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express (4526 points, 513 comments)
  2. 2391 points, 2 submissions: MoonMan_666
    1. Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second. (2369 points, 380 comments)
    2. Dev sends Bitcoin without using the web or the power grid (22 points, 4 comments)
  3. 2077 points, 1 submission: _Logicrypto
    1. When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time (2077 points, 69 comments)
  4. 1496 points, 1 submission: bitbug42
    1. ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet (1496 points, 186 comments)
  5. 1417 points, 1 submission: opencoins
    1. Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto. (1417 points, 244 comments)
  6. 1174 points, 1 submission: awertheim
    1. Took a while but finally part of the picture club (had to wait on the web browser update!) (1174 points, 127 comments)
  7. 853 points, 1 submission: Hodl_it
    1. Feeling good? (853 points, 215 comments)
  8. 833 points, 1 submission: cointastical
    1. Bitcoin ATM operator gets the $62,500 that police confiscated back (833 points, 110 comments)
  9. 802 points, 2 submissions: JandyJammer
    1. Congratulations US senators for understanding crypto better than this guy (748 points, 125 comments)
    2. How is Bitmex the biggest exchange... total joke. I hope their competitors crush them. (54 points, 49 comments)
  10. 704 points, 1 submission: lesbiansareoverrated
    1. ...in case you missed the laura shill burn today (704 points, 100 comments)
  11. 512 points, 5 submissions: castorfromtheva
    1. Mycelium wallet will FINALLY get segwit! "This month" as stated by Mycelium developers on 9 October 2018. Glad to hear! I am excited. (312 points, 136 comments)
    2. Just saw it on their website: Ledger Nano S 20% off, directly from manufacturer! For six days, starting today. Just in case you consider getting a hardware wallet. (146 points, 84 comments)
    3. Newsflash: Bitfinex Unveils ‘Distributed Banking Solution,’ Resumes Fiat Deposits (44 points, 8 comments)
    4. Binance Uganda Launch 80% Ready As Users Can Now Sign Up: Deposits & Trading Coming Soon (8 points, 1 comment)
    5. Article: "Cryptos at a turning point", trustnodes.com (2 points, 0 comments)
  12. 510 points, 4 submissions: eddieweng
    1. Someone moved 12,220 BTC ($82M) in block 545,877 (393 points, 180 comments)
    2. Someone moved 22,200 BTC ($139M) in block 545,243 (90 points, 38 comments)
    3. CoinMarketBull – CoinMarketCap, but with a different metric (26 points, 4 comments)
    4. holdernews - trending stories on bitcointalk (1 point, 0 comments)
  13. 387 points, 1 submission: StoneHammers
    1. We are three months away from Bitcoins 10 year anniversary. (387 points, 39 comments)
  14. 366 points, 3 submissions: TrackCoinMarket-com
    1. Citizens of Venezuela have turned to Bitcoin and gold farming in online games to survive the country’s economic collapse. (365 points, 60 comments)
    2. Zambian Central Bank Declares Bitcoin Is Not Legal Tender (1 point, 7 comments)
    3. Bitcoin is Maturing, Crypto Growth Surprisingly Positive Reveals Study (0 points, 3 comments)
  15. 358 points, 1 submission: musicfan39
    1. Bitcoin all-time price graph (Aug 2010 – Oct 2018) (358 points, 84 comments)
  16. 311 points, 5 submissions: TheGreatMuffin
    1. Bitfinex' statement on fiat deposits/withdrawals (tldr: fiat and crypto withdrawals working, fiat deposits temporarily paused) (103 points, 52 comments)
    2. Bitfinex suspends all fiat deposits, “expects the situation to normalize within a week” (78 points, 62 comments)
    3. Fidelity gives a nod to OG cypherpunks (mentioning Adam Back, Nick Szabo, David Chaum) and bitcoin's precursors in their newest blog post (78 points, 0 comments)
    4. full video of the US Senate hearing on cryptocurrency: with P. Van Valkenburgh and N. Roubini as witnesses (starts at minute 16) (31 points, 5 comments)
    5. Interview with one of the creators of the Samourai wallet (21 points, 1 comment)
  17. 305 points, 1 submission: 6maud
    1. Jamie Dimon: Bitcoin is a scam. Also Jamie Dimon: Let's file 20 blockchain patents so we don't miss out on this blockchain thing. facepalm (305 points, 93 comments)
  18. 274 points, 2 submissions: undertheradar48
    1. $6.9 trillion of assets just got access to the world of crypto! (169 points, 24 comments)
    2. 1.65 Million people are attending over 5,000 Bitcoin meetups around the world. Organic interest/curiosity is real! (105 points, 41 comments)
  19. 265 points, 1 submission: NoGooderr
    1. Shorters, are you okay? (265 points, 123 comments)
  20. 253 points, 5 submissions: _smudger_
    1. Bakkt CEO: We're About To See A Cryptocurrency Revolution (130 points, 29 comments)
    2. Our team, launch and advocacy – Bakkt Blog – Medium (104 points, 33 comments)
    3. Coinbase's Adam White is joining Bakkt as its COO - The Block (16 points, 1 comment)
    4. The Bright Side of the 2018 Bitcoin Bear Market – Wes Carlson – Medium (2 points, 0 comments)
    5. Analysis: ErisX & Bakkt Are All in on the Battle for Institutional Cash (1 point, 0 comments)
  21. 247 points, 1 submission: Fly115
    1. It would be impossible for every Fidelity brokerage customer to own even one Bitcoin. This is why Bitcoins are worth thousands of dollars, while a dollar is only worth one dollar (and only until next year when when it's worth 97 cents). - Erik Voorhees (247 points, 129 comments)
  22. 237 points, 1 submission: manfromnantucket1984
    1. Bear markets are for building! 🐻⚡ While the price is doing what it does, we continue to build the #LightningNetwork at the #LightningHackdayNYC in New York on October 27th/28th 2018. Speakers like Christian Decker, Matt Corallo and Peter Todd will take you down the rabbit hole. (237 points, 15 comments)
  23. 232 points, 1 submission: TheMidnightMatinee
    1. Guys lets rally and show your support for an BTC ETF! Here's why! (232 points, 63 comments)
  24. 231 points, 2 submissions: installeris
    1. Fidelity just made it easier for hedge funds and other pros to invest in cryptocurrencies (169 points, 36 comments)
    2. Nouriel Roubini has always been talking sh*t about Bitcoin. And he's always wrong. (62 points, 29 comments)
  25. 226 points, 1 submission: lewtr
    1. An easter egg in the Bitcoin genesis block code (226 points, 40 comments)
  26. 218 points, 1 submission: Unusual_Mountain
    1. Bitcoin as a safe haven from monetary policy can help keep governments and banks honest. It doesn't have to replace them. (218 points, 85 comments)
  27. 214 points, 1 submission: Mobilenewsflash
    1. Roubini (214 points, 50 comments)
  28. 212 points, 1 submission: CardCollector1
    1. Getting Started with BTCPay Server - Free and Open Source Bitcoin and Lightning Network payment processor (212 points, 75 comments)
  29. 201 points, 1 submission: yonstonston
    1. Sorry guys, i bought BTC yesterday... (201 points, 72 comments)
  30. 161 points, 2 submissions: linzex
    1. A Bitcoin Lesson From A Yogi Master (93 points, 6 comments)
    2. ChangeNow Exchange Accused of $70,000 Theft (68 points, 8 comments)
  31. 159 points, 3 submissions: zappadoing
    1. greetings from holidays - I thought I won't have to read anything about bitcoin this time... (130 points, 12 comments)
    2. Telegram down! Lots of Bitcoin-Groups not accessible. We need something decentralized. (19 points, 26 comments)
    3. Colleges Are Baffled by Bitcoin Donations (10 points, 0 comments)
  32. 159 points, 1 submission: Crevative
    1. Zimbabwe spirals into economic chaos as fears of another round of hyperinflation begin to spark - another fiat currency fails! (159 points, 20 comments)
  33. 147 points, 1 submission: lexihayes99
    1. Just wanted to remind people of a simpler time :) (147 points, 196 comments)
  34. 146 points, 1 submission: Rare_Ad
    1. Bitcoin was a tool that was born of the economic crisis some 10 years ago, does that mean another big recession or banking collapse could catapult it forward? (146 points, 87 comments)
  35. 146 points, 1 submission: vmrey
    1. Buda, the largest crypto exchange by volume in Chile, is one of the first to incorporate Lightning network. (146 points, 14 comments)
  36. 145 points, 1 submission: wwwdata
    1. I own crypto but not Bitcoin. (145 points, 243 comments)
  37. 141 points, 9 submissions: expertbit
    1. This E-Bike Accepts Payments With Bitcoin's Lightning Network (51 points, 3 comments)
    2. Bitcoin [BTC] transfers will become a lot faster with Liquid Network, says Jimmy Song (37 points, 58 comments)
    3. Top Universities Are Now Investing in Cryptocurrency Funds (18 points, 0 comments)
    4. Indian Exchange Unocoin Could Launch Crypto ATMs (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Price Stability -- A Bullish Or Bearish Sign? (15 points, 1 comment)
    6. Don’t Underestimate China’s Power In Bitcoin (2 points, 3 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Price Analysis: Bulls Defend Yearly Support Amidst Wall Street Slump (1 point, 0 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Network Comes To A Standstill In China (0 points, 2 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Price Jumps by $600 to Reach One-Month High Above $6.9k (0 points, 0 comments)
  38. 137 points, 1 submission: diditmakesound
    1. Everyone still buying right now (137 points, 30 comments)
  39. 135 points, 1 submission: gattacibus
    1. POLONIEX suspends Bitcoin withdrawals (135 points, 86 comments)
  40. 129 points, 3 submissions: nopara73
    1. Wasabi Wallet added OSX support. Please consider testing it. (55 points, 25 comments)
    2. Scoring Bitcoin Wallets (38 points, 25 comments)
    3. A Technical Overview of Wasabi Wallet, Future Ideas, Plans and Strategy (36 points, 1 comment)
  41. 123 points, 1 submission: Big_Bluefin
    1. Live from Fremont Street in Las Vegas (123 points, 20 comments)
  42. 121 points, 1 submission: agustinf
    1. Latin American Exchange Buda.com adds Lightning Network payments for all. (121 points, 17 comments)
  43. 118 points, 2 submissions: TheCrunk1
    1. Fidelity launches new company for trading, storing cryptocurrencies (98 points, 26 comments)
    2. Binance launches fiat-to-crypto exchange in Uganda (20 points, 7 comments)
  44. 112 points, 1 submission: Thinkmoreaboutit
    1. "Over the weekend I sent a bitcoin transaction to a relay 12.6km away with no cell network or internet connection. Here's a tweetstorm about how I used @gotenna and @SamouraiWallet to do it" [email protected] (112 points, 20 comments)
  45. 111 points, 1 submission: Jackieknows
    1. When it comes to your coins, keep it quiet. – Trezor Blog (111 points, 10 comments)
  46. 110 points, 1 submission: 100ravp
    1. Someone solved the 310.00 BTC challenge (110 points, 87 comments)
  47. 110 points, 1 submission: loulan
    1. There was an attempt (110 points, 78 comments)
  48. 106 points, 1 submission: king-only
    1. Breez, a Lightning Network mobile client, is now fully open sourced (106 points, 19 comments)
  49. 101 points, 2 submissions: HodlingToTheMoon
    1. Websites using Joomla (second most popular platform after Wordpress), can now be enabled with Bitcoin payments - In less than 5 min! (98 points, 5 comments)
    2. Got business on your mind? Here are 7 easy and genuine ideas to start a Bitcoin-centric e-commerce store! (3 points, 0 comments)
  50. 98 points, 1 submission: ubunt2
    1. Fidelity Starts Crypto Unit to Serve Wall Street Customers (98 points, 4 comments)
  51. 97 points, 1 submission: CosmicHemorroid
    1. Lightning Powered E-bike #Reckless (97 points, 22 comments)
  52. 96 points, 3 submissions: DesignerAccount
    1. Bitcoin is all grown up! (83 points, 6 comments)
    2. [Bitcoin OpSec - Keep your coins safe] Detailed breakdown of sophisticated scam (12 points, 6 comments)
    3. Infographic - How do UTXOs work? (1 point, 0 comments)
  53. 96 points, 1 submission: bowlingfries
    1. Bitcoin kiosk in Portland OR weed dispensary (96 points, 21 comments)
  54. 94 points, 1 submission: nassimmontreal
    1. #roubinilovescrypto (94 points, 37 comments)
  55. 92 points, 2 submissions: ella11price
    1. Selling goods and items for Bitcoin should be easy. I built a marketplace similar to eBay so people can sell anything for crypto. This video explains it. (91 points, 63 comments)
    2. The best ways to earn bitcoin and cryptocurrency. Includes how to spot a scam (1 point, 0 comments)
  56. 91 points, 1 submission: ytcoinartist
    1. The Golden Pineapple, a 3D combination puzzle for all ages and free to play. Be the first to solve the final level and win 1 BTC, courtesy of The Pineapple Fund. http://pineapplearcade.net/arcade-game/pineapple (91 points, 25 comments)
  57. 89 points, 1 submission: Rachsuchtig
    1. An BTC ATM at Austria/Salzburg Shopping Arena, totally surprised to see (89 points, 11 comments)
  58. 87 points, 2 submissions: Ishan1121
    1. Bitcoin proves once again its the best way to transfer money! $194 million transferred for 10 cents. (87 points, 18 comments)
    2. Discussion: So Bitcoin rises as fake news on Binance delisting Tether (USDT) goes viral...removing Tether completley will affect the market positively? THoughts? (0 points, 6 comments)
  59. 87 points, 1 submission: Blixx87
    1. I finally figured it out! We have been forming a Dorito Pattern and it’s on it’s way to the cheese dip. (87 points, 49 comments)
  60. 86 points, 8 submissions: EffigyBoy
    1. Venezuelans Play RuneScape To Make Small Profit In Bitcoin (31 points, 4 comments)
    2. CFTC Chair On Bitcoin Expansion: "We Are Seeing More Institutional Movement Into This Area" (26 points, 0 comments)
    3. The Indian Government is Considering to Launch Its Own Cryptocurrency to Avoid Citizens Using Bitcoin (13 points, 14 comments)
    4. The Congress Is Groping In The Dark To Handle Cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin has come into the mainstream. (6 points, 0 comments)
    5. After Stock Markets Plunge Cryptocurrency Whale Dumps over 22 100 BTC (5 points, 11 comments)
    6. Scientific Journal 'Chaos' Favors Bitcoin – As stable as Oil and Dollar Markets (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. The First Physical Cryptocurrency Store in The U.S. Launches on October 20 (2 points, 1 comment)
    8. Omniex and Gemini Struck A Partnership to Support Institutional Investors (1 point, 0 comments)
  61. 85 points, 2 submissions: jakesonwu
    1. Release - Eclair v0.2-beta7 - Compatible with Bitcoin Core 0.17.0 (75 points, 8 comments)
    2. Lord Keynes Would Be Proud (10 points, 1 comment)
  62. 84 points, 2 submissions: renepickhardt
    1. ECDSA is not that bad: two-party signing without Schnorr or BLS (by Stepan Snigirev) (53 points, 7 comments)
    2. Last week in Lightning Network: A weekly collection of lightning network (and related) news on Twitter (31 points, 6 comments)
  63. 83 points, 3 submissions: OldCarpet54
    1. [GIVEAWAY] Crypto Invest Summit – Wozniak, Gupta, Morehead (82 points, 1 comment)
    2. blockchain news: from SF Blockchain Week and XBlockchain (1 point, 0 comments)
    3. Buterin | SpankChain | Kambria: San Francisco Blockchain Week (0 points, 0 comments)
  64. 83 points, 1 submission: -elektro-pionir-
    1. AMA with Bitcoin engineer Jameson Lopp (83 points, 21 comments)
  65. 80 points, 3 submissions: ysangkok
    1. Bitcoin script discussion at Scaling Bitcoin: "Sporks are probabilistic soft-forks [...] where instead of [...] version bits if the blockhash has some [...] PoW below some threshold, it activates. [...] [E.g.] you have an expectation of 6 months to get your shit together. Doing it live." (28 points, 3 comments)
    2. Multi-Hop Locks for Secure, Privacy-Preserving and Interoperable Payment-Channel Networks (27 points, 8 comments)
    3. Scaling Bitcoin Kaizen - Scriptless scripts, adaptor signatures and their applications (25 points, 2 comments)
  66. 78 points, 3 submissions: mkuraja
    1. What's the difference between Lightning Network and Liquid Network? (57 points, 41 comments)
    2. Need some fresh, new FOMO in your life? Reenter, Trace Mayer. (15 points, 1 comment)
    3. This American tourist thought I'd see "Bitcoin Accepted Here" all over Tokyo, Japan but not one place found yet. (6 points, 17 comments)
  67. 77 points, 1 submission: Miladran
    1. Fidelity Says It Will Trade Bitcoin for Hedge Funds (77 points, 1 comment)
  68. 77 points, 1 submission: pandaman200
    1. Swiss Crypto Fund Obtains Country’s First Crypto Asset Management License (77 points, 4 comments)
  69. 75 points, 3 submissions: mickhick95
    1. I purchased a goTenna to broadcast my BTC transactions with TxTenna and Samourai Wallet. (44 points, 15 comments)
    2. I saw a Bitcoin ATM and I had to make a purchase. (28 points, 41 comments)
    3. 303-ish Days in the BTC Bear Market, This Sideways Motion Looks Like A Turn Around!!! (3 points, 16 comments)
  70. 75 points, 1 submission: hcarpach
    1. Venezuelan cryptocurrency miner: “we are police’s most wanted” (75 points, 21 comments)
  71. 73 points, 6 submissions: WorkCoin_Team
    1. “Bitcoin enables certain uses that are very unique. I think it offers possibilities that no other currency allows. For example the ability to spend a coin that only occurs when two separate parties agree to spend the coin; with a third party that couldn’t run away with the coin itself.” – Pieter Wui (66 points, 14 comments)
    2. Revolution of Bitcoin (5 points, 3 comments)
    3. A Funny Bitcoin Thought (2 points, 20 comments)
    4. Getting started with Bitcoin (0 points, 1 comment)
    5. Make your foundation strong (0 points, 0 comments)
    6. What are you not willing to compromise? (0 points, 6 comments)
  72. 73 points, 1 submission: ozdixon
    1. Bitcoin accepted at a absenth bar in Prague. (73 points, 11 comments)
  73. 72 points, 1 submission: Itasia
    1. What Are Atomic Swaps? Ultimate Guide (72 points, 16 comments)
  74. 71 points, 1 submission: MannyAndDrChurchShow
    1. I wonder if they would still honor this card.... (71 points, 9 comments)
  75. 68 points, 4 submissions: grittygatorr
    1. Liquid Network - the world’s first production Bitcoin sidechain has officially gone live (65 points, 100 comments)
    2. XDEX Advertises Commission-Free Bitcoin Trading in Brazil (2 points, 0 comments)
    3. Coinfloor to Cut on Staff and Reorganize Amid Volume Fluctuations in the Crypto Markets (1 point, 0 comments)
    4. Barclays Temporarily Suspends Work on Cryptocurrency Trading Project (0 points, 1 comment)
  76. 68 points, 1 submission: WouterGlorieux
    1. Introducing 'The Bitcoin Spellbook': an open-source REST API server for the back-end of (almost) any Bitcoin application. (Think of it as your own IfThisThenThat server but for Bitcoin) (68 points, 3 comments)
  77. 67 points, 1 submission: Vaultoro_official
    1. Leading up to the LightingNetwork Hackathon in NY, I thought I would post the talks we filmed at the Berlin lightningHackDay. Some amazing talks! (67 points, 1 comment)
  78. 65 points, 1 submission: Komodor123
    1. Do you speak more than one language? Then help spread Bitcoin around the world by translating Bitcoin.org! (65 points, 28 comments)
  79. 63 points, 1 submission: Sandiegosurf1
    1. Fidelity Launches Institutional Crypto Trading and Clearing. Let the institutional money flow! (63 points, 1 comment)
  80. 63 points, 1 submission: TearAnus-SoreAssRekt
    1. Buying PC Games With Bitcoin: Site Reviews (with some accepting Lightning!) (63 points, 7 comments)
  81. 62 points, 1 submission: CryptoCloaks
    1. We finally got our RaspiBlitz case to a level we love! Time for load testing to check thermals, final mods are almost done! (62 points, 10 comments)
  82. 61 points, 1 submission: sagiher
    1. #Liberte#CaribbeanBitcoin#ShoutOutToAllBitcoinDeveloperOutThere (61 points, 9 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. PragmaticParadox (465 points, 7 comments)
  2. ikarienator (462 points, 1 comment)
  3. Hanspanzer (434 points, 106 comments)
  4. Toyake (434 points, 71 comments)
  5. uglymelt (394 points, 3 comments)
  6. UsherTechs (377 points, 1 comment)
  7. isdudu (345 points, 4 comments)
  8. TyroneTheDriver (307 points, 1 comment)
  9. Rattlesnake_Mullet (296 points, 11 comments)
  10. andycam7 (282 points, 3 comments)
  11. dmdeemer (275 points, 1 comment)
  12. BTCkoning (266 points, 114 comments)
  13. CP70 (257 points, 7 comments)
  14. ascension8438 (239 points, 7 comments)
  15. Fly115 (226 points, 9 comments)
  16. haribo_2016 (220 points, 4 comments)
  17. dsmid (214 points, 1 comment)
  18. i_gotta_say (208 points, 87 comments)
  19. TheGreatMuffin (206 points, 56 comments)
  20. ebaley (198 points, 34 comments)
  21. bitsteiner (185 points, 86 comments)
  22. Redditridder (181 points, 5 comments)
  23. KupKhunKrap (173 points, 36 comments)
  24. 45sbvad (169 points, 3 comments)
  25. c3corvette (165 points, 2 comments)
  26. killerstorm (163 points, 8 comments)
  27. evilgrinz (158 points, 48 comments)
  28. chronic_nervosa (140 points, 1 comment)
  29. bigdaddysdick (136 points, 7 comments)
  30. castorfromtheva (129 points, 27 comments)
  31. Touchmyhandle (125 points, 12 comments)
  32. Euphoricsoul (122 points, 1 comment)
  33. WaterMac27 (122 points, 1 comment)
  34. DSXIII (118 points, 1 comment)
  35. RIMS_REAL_BIG (117 points, 24 comments)
  36. cryptogrip (112 points, 39 comments)
  37. WalterRyan (108 points, 10 comments)
  38. sudophant (107 points, 5 comments)
  39. NotSeeTroll (104 points, 37 comments)
  40. deadleg22 (104 points, 10 comments)
  41. shared_makes_it_real (103 points, 26 comments)
  42. alexiglesias007 (103 points, 7 comments)
  43. Buttoshi (102 points, 68 comments)
  44. flunderbossanova (102 points, 59 comments)
  45. lexihayes99 (101 points, 28 comments)
  46. mabezard (101 points, 2 comments)
  47. peniswithahoodie (98 points, 1 comment)
  48. beloboi (96 points, 65 comments)
  49. vovr (89 points, 3 comments)
  50. segells4soulsmogoblo (89 points, 1 comment)
  51. damchi (87 points, 21 comments)
  52. smadgerano (81 points, 14 comments)
  53. time_wasted504 (80 points, 34 comments)
  54. joeknowswhoiam (80 points, 16 comments)
  55. diydude2 (79 points, 26 comments)
  56. sQtWLgK (79 points, 17 comments)
  57. 989x4000 (78 points, 22 comments)
  58. sreaka (78 points, 16 comments)
  59. YoungScholar89 (78 points, 6 comments)
  60. Ellipso (76 points, 2 comments)
  61. HitsABlunt (76 points, 1 comment)
  62. almkglor (75 points, 39 comments)
  63. MrRGnome (75 points, 37 comments)
  64. Daddeus65 (75 points, 28 comments)
  65. whalecheetah (75 points, 25 comments)
  66. BCash_BeTrash (75 points, 23 comments)
  67. cipher-space (75 points, 19 comments)
  68. bnuttall (72 points, 2 comments)
  69. chrisrico (71 points, 26 comments)
  70. esdraelon (71 points, 8 comments)
  71. ale1ormont (71 points, 2 comments)
  72. igadjeed (70 points, 42 comments)
  73. Holographiks (70 points, 19 comments)
  74. frankieboy07 (70 points, 2 comments)
  75. snazzycoins (69 points, 12 comments)
  76. dmar198 (69 points, 11 comments)
  77. protoman86 (69 points, 7 comments)
  78. bitbug42 (68 points, 5 comments)
  79. CardCollector1 (66 points, 16 comments)
  80. hawks5999 (66 points, 7 comments)
  81. DefiantVerse (65 points, 12 comments)
  82. psionides (65 points, 8 comments)
  83. btc-forextrader (64 points, 37 comments)
  84. UniqueNewQuark (63 points, 5 comments)
  85. imaducksfan (63 points, 1 comment)
  86. bitusher (62 points, 23 comments)
  87. homad (62 points, 13 comments)
  88. torbitonsa (62 points, 7 comments)
  89. violencequalsbad (62 points, 7 comments)
  90. wwwdata (61 points, 20 comments)
  91. LadyRosedancer (61 points, 1 comment)
  92. Nunoyabiznes (60 points, 22 comments)
  93. pg3crypto (60 points, 13 comments)
  94. XxArmadaxX (60 points, 4 comments)
  95. awertheim (59 points, 27 comments)
  96. Ploxxx69 (59 points, 1 comment)
  97. TheGlassStone (59 points, 1 comment)
  98. moodytomatoes (58 points, 39 comments)
  99. Sneakybobo (58 points, 13 comments)
  100. UniqueCandy (58 points, 8 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express by Alexsayzz (4526 points, 513 comments)
  2. Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second. by MoonMan_666 (2369 points, 380 comments)
  3. When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time by _Logicrypto (2077 points, 69 comments)
  4. ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet by bitbug42 (1496 points, 186 comments)
  5. Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto. by opencoins (1417 points, 244 comments)
  6. Took a while but finally part of the picture club (had to wait on the web browser update!) by awertheim (1174 points, 127 comments)
  7. Feeling good? by Hodl_it (853 points, 215 comments)
  8. Bitcoin ATM operator gets the $62,500 that police confiscated back by cointastical (833 points, 110 comments)
  9. Congratulations US senators for understanding crypto better than this guy by JandyJammer (748 points, 125 comments)
  10. ...in case you missed the laura shill burn today by lesbiansareoverrated (704 points, 100 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 462 points: ikarienator's comment in Feeling good?
  2. 456 points: PragmaticParadox's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  3. 387 points: uglymelt's comment in ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet
  4. 377 points: UsherTechs's comment in When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time
  5. 342 points: isdudu's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  6. 307 points: TyroneTheDriver's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  7. 276 points: andycam7's comment in Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto.
  8. 275 points: dmdeemer's comment in Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second.
  9. 268 points: Rattlesnake_Mullet's comment in Someone moved 12,220 BTC ($82M) in block 545,877
  10. 244 points: CP70's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/CryptoCurrency] As Bitcoin Gold Jumps 50%+ in one day, time to ask... what is Coinbase doing with all those fork ...

The following post by jam-hay is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been openly removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ CryptoCurrency/comments/7wg4kq
The original post's content was as follows:
Today Bitcoin Gold (BTG) has a MC of $2,630,984,532, each are worth $156.47. In the past 24hrs the price has outperformed most jumping almost 50%+.
BTG hard forked from Bitcoin on 24 October 2017, and has survived for months now.
Here was the Coinbase official stance on the matter from last year:
https://support.coinbase.com/customeportal/articles/2892196-bitcoin-gold-faq
You can see a list of all the major exchanges and wallets that have now implemented support for BTG here which include Bitfinex, Binance, Shapeshift, Ledger, Trezor etc
https://bitcoingold.org
GDAX Coinbase's exchange is still tagged as "future".
Todays spike is a strange one as there has been a fair amount of community cynicism over BTG in the past.
Some of the controversies outlined on its wiki included post-mining, bonus taking, secret mining code and wallet hacks.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitcoin_Gold
That said when you think about the amount of money being retained by large exchanges such as coinbase from all the forks such as BTG, it ptobably eclipses anything BTG has done value wise. In fact BTG has probably posted more updates than Coinbase on the BTG funds they're holding.
The obvious reminder is always retain your private keys yourself, keep them in a hard wallet away from the exchanges or you'll always run the risk of not being able to benifit frim the growing number of hard forks.
That said, I think many newcomers, particularly using gateway exchanges to buy gateway crypto's have just got to grips with concept of Crypto and buying it.
I can understand how then buying hardware wallets and transferring crypto to them could be a daunting task.
I think for those people, maybe lured in to crypto with the likes of Coinbase referral programs really deserve to get at least regular updates from exchanges that are not supporting forks... how, where, why and when.
Also this doesn't include Airdrops where new ICO cryptos are distributed relative to someones holdings of another Crypto such as Bitcoin or Ethereum... again Exchange hodlers are missing out.
Companies and stock brokers need to keep investors updated when issuing dividends to shareholders,
That helps investors to make the educated decision whither or not to keep their money in invested in that company or not for the longterm.
Exchanges should be doing the same for forked funds.
I think with ever new fork that emerges Coinbase are setting themselves up for future legal challenge of somesort, forcing them to go back and support/ distribute all the forked funds they are holding.
This was evident in the case of Bitcoin Cash as it was only rumors of legal action against them that really seemed to get them to up their game.
This is a the risky cloud that will hang over them, particularly when going out for more rounds of funding their growth, as it's a big question mark future risk investors.
They need to be proactive addressing forked funds, instead of just bottling up a future storm by ignoring them.
All in all forks aren't really Coinbase's fault, but their lack of updates are. They have warned people just to take their crypto off the exchange in the past, but when at the same time as they are priding themselves on and encouraging the sign ups of newcomers that maybe aren't as technically minded I don't think this is enough?
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anleitung: VeChain (VET) bei Binance kaufen ✅ HOW TO BUY BITCOIN / CRYPTOCURRENCY ON BINANCE US FAST (Step by Step for Beginners 2019) URGENT! BITCOIN SV RELEASED FROM COINBASE! MOVE UR COINS ASAP!!!! This Line Is Critical For Bitcoin + Binance Scandal How To Buy, Sell and Deposit Bitcoin to Binance ( Binance Tutorial) DigiByte - Binance - Coinbase - Gemini - Kraken Binance Chain --- The Epitome Of $hitcoin Platforms How To Use A Bitcoin Hardware Wallet: Ledger Nano X - YouTube How To Move Your Altcoins From Binance To Bittrex Bitcoin Wallet: Ledger Nano S & Trezor One Hardware ...

Direkt zu Binance. Bei Binance handelt es sich um einen Kryptowährung Broker mit Sitz in Shanghai, China. Handelbar sind zahlreiche Coins, beispielsweise Bitcoin, Litecoin und Ethereum. Coinbase ist der größte Anbieter (Screenshot Coinbase) Das bietet Bitpanda Bitpanda bietet Ihnen das Kaufen und Verkaufen von Bitcoin, Ethereum, Dash, Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash und Ripple an. Damit hat die Plattform zwei Kryptowährungen mehr als Coinbase im Angebot. Der Binance Coin, der auch als BNB bezeichnet, ist der native Coin der Kryptowährungsbörse Binance, die auf der Ethereum-Blockchain unter Verwendung des ERC20-Token-Standards aufgebaut wurde.Binance hat 200 Millionen BNB ausgeben. Das primäre Ziel war es, die Börse zu fördern und gleichzeitig den Händlern und Liebhabern von Kryptowährungen Bequemlichkeit und Erschwinglichkeit zu bieten. Coinbase ist eine sichere Plattform, mit der Kryptowährung wie Bitcoin, Ethereum und vieles mehr problemlos gekauft, verkauft und gespeichert werden kann. Coinbase hat seinen Sitz in den USA und ist verfügbar in über 30 Ländern weltweit. Bei Coinbase fallen für viele Transaktionen Gebühren an. Möchten Sie mit Bitcoins und Co. handeln, kommen Sie um einige Gebühren dort nicht herum. Wie viel Geld Sie zahlen müssen, zeigen wir Ihnen in diesem Praxistipp. U.S. crypto exchange Coinbase will begin providing bitcoin-backed cash loans to pick out prospects as early as subsequent month. Traders can borrow as much as 30% of the bitcoin they maintain on the exchange, or a most $20,000, it mentioned. Entdecken Sie mit Coinbase die Top-50-Kryptowährungen, einschließlich der Preisdiagramme für Kryptowährung, der Kryptowährungsbeschreibungen und der aktuellen Preise für Bitcoin und Ethereum. Now Binance, one of the top crypto exchanges worldwide by trade volume, has announced the company is starting a mining pool. The exchange Binance recently announced the launch of a mining pool ...

[index] [18812] [8519] [13655] [21888] [8978] [5832] [20975] [6230] [21161] [24038]

Anleitung: VeChain (VET) bei Binance kaufen ✅

Binance Referral: https://goo.gl/RD7pLD $10 Of Free Bitcoin, Coinbase Referral: https://goo.gl/qKZMmB Ledger Hardware Wallet Referral: https://goo.gl/tdcSmF Disclaimer: Statements on this site do ... Buy a Ledger Nano X Here: https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-backup-pack?r=faca MY ALL-ENCOMPASSING GUIDE TO GETTING STARTED WITH BITCOIN: https://www.b... Binance spare 10% Gebühren: https://www.binance.com/en/register?ref=LUKU79QJ Coinbase 10 USD Gratis: https://www.coinbase.com/join/5bcf4942aa464b01cd20f5c0?l... Bitcoin Wallet: Ledger Nano S & Trezor One Hardware Wallets Step-by-Step Guide (For Beginners!) This video is a step-by-step guide about bitcoin wallets for ... How to BUY BITCOIN in 2019 and EARN $15 FOR FREE on Binance US after sign up and $100 worth of trading volume with the following link: https://www.binance.us... "Binance review" "Binance tutorials" "is binance legit" "is binance safe" "binance fees" "binance app" "binance login" "coinbase review" "binance wallet" how to buy bitcoin,how to sell bitcoin ... This Line Is Critical For Bitcoin + Binance Scandal Altcoin Daily. Loading... Unsubscribe from Altcoin Daily? Cancel Unsubscribe. Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 161K. Loading ... binance how to buy bitcoins how to buy bitcoins with paypal how to buy bitcoins with credit card how to buy bitcoins with cash how to buy bitcoin stock how to buy bitcoins anonymously how to buy ... Kraken Exchange Tutorial 2020 - Buy & Sell Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP & other Cryptocurrencies - Duration: 12:21. Kierin Mulholland - Ethereum DeFi & Crypto Videos 7,968 views 12:21 📺 HARDWARE WALLETS ... COINBASE EARN A FREE $10 ... meaning bitcoin mining bitcoin news bitcoin price bitcoin scammer list bitcoin sec bitcoin spam bitcoin wallet bitcoin wiki buy ripple cboe ...

https://binance-review.portal-mining.pw